Tuesday, May 4, 2010

Changes of Heart and Character

I have a book which is now in the hands of a publisher. It was recently submitted so it will take quite a bit of time to hear back about publishing or not. When I submitted the manuscript it included a character that now the creator of the book wants omitted. (I am basically the ghostwriter and the one who submitted the book...it's a long story.) Now what? Do I resubmit a manuscript? Wait for a yeah or nay by the publisher? If the publisher likes the story, do I still have the option of saying the character wants to be omitted? The creator is very attached to his book and refuses to bend on this point. So, does that make the manuscript now void?
No, not necessarily. I mean, it's not one of the main characters, is it?

I'd suggest you wait to hear from the publisher, and if there's interest, let them know immediately about this change. Most likely they won't have a problem with it.

And if they do, then you can assume they wouldn't have wanted the revised manuscript, can't you?

5 comments:

myimaginaryblog said...

I love the titles of your posts.

That is all.

Anonymous said...

There's a lot of give and take in these situations. But the thing is, you've got to do some of the giving not just the taking. But I'm getting way ahead of myself -- the "creator" refusing to "bend on this point" suggests an unrealistic attitude toward the editing process. Editors are there to make the book the best it can be, and being open to their suggestions makes for a more developed, streamlined book.

My big concern is that this ms has been written, revised, polished, and NOW the creator is wanting to make a big change. Whoever the creator is they've got to get their head screwed on straight, and fast. 1)Don't give the go-ahead to send out a book if if you're not sure it's done, and 2) this business requires a flexibility in working with editors, and coypeditors, book designers, and on and on...

Warren on Writing said...

Short and right to the point. I love it and as always, it is excellent information.

Mark Herr said...

Now I’m curious why this character “has to” be dropped.

Back in the Golden Age of Comics, the word “FLICK” was not allowed because the printing was poor enough that the “L” and the “I” might run together. Thus ended the career of Flitty Flicker.

Jan said...

And this is why ghostwriters normally write and pick up their check and walk away. Now you're in a position of trying to sell a work you're not actually in control of creatively. That had "horrors ahead" stamped all over it.